Day trip to Seville from Cadiz Spain by Train

We were onboard the Norwegian Cruise Lines Epic on a repositioning cruise from Port Canaveral, FL to Barcelona with various stops along the way - the third stop being Cadiz. Based on the historical significance of Seville and all that we'd read about it we chose to travel to Seville for the day by train instead of spending our time in Cadiz.

Cadiz is 4,456 sea miles from Port Canaveral and 637 sea miles northwest of Funchal Madeira. Cádiz is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in Western Europe, with archaeological remains dating back 3,100 years & was founded by the Phoenicians. It has been a principal home port of the Spanish Navy since the accession of the Spanish Bourbons in the 18th century. The city is a member of the Most Ancient European Towns Network. It is also the site of the University of Cádiz.

Caution: If you are coming here on a tour, then you can disregard this text. If you have come here via train from a cruise ship in Cadiz then read on; Seville is a large city, however, the old historic area is relatively condensed and can be easily reached from the San Bernardo Train Station. Since you will be on a schedule based upon the required time to reboard your cruise ship, you are going to have to plan your Seville exploration carefully and keep an eye on your clock!

 Quick History Lesson 

According to a 2016 census estimate, the population of the city of Cádiz was 118,919 (the second most populated of the province after Jerez de la Frontera with 212,830 inhabitants), and that of its metropolitan area was 629,054. Cádiz is the seventeenth-largest Spanish city. In recent years, the city's population has steadily declined; it is the only municipality of the Bay of Cádiz (the comarca composed of Cádiz, Chiclana, El Puerto de Santa María, Puerto Real, and San Fernando), whose population has diminished. Between 1995 and 2006, it lost more than 14,000 residents, a decrease of 9%.

Among the causes of this loss of population is the peculiar geography of Cádiz; the city lies on a narrow spit of land hemmed in by the sea. Consequently, there is a pronounced shortage of land to be developed. The city has very little vacant land, and a high proportion of its housing stock is relatively low in density. The older quarters of Cádiz are full of buildings that, because of their age and historical significance, are not eligible for urban renewal.


 The above information was extracted from Wikipedia.
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If you have never been to Seville & either you are planning a trip there, or you just want to know more about it, here are some good sources of information;

Exploring Cadiz & Seville

Since the majority of this visit was about Seville as opposed to Cadiz (where we did not spend much time), from here on out, everything will be about Seville.

The ship arrived in Cadiz harbor at 7AM, but passengers were not allowed to disembark until nearly 8AM (Spanish Customs, etc). We headed straight to the Cadiz Train Station (located at Plaza Sevilla) to obtain train tickets for Seville. It is only a kilometer walk from the cruise pier, but the Cadiz Port authorities required all passengers to take a shuttle bus to the Cruise Port entrance - so our walk began there. Somewhat out of our intended direction, but still just a walk down the Avenue del Puerto to the Plaza de Sevilla and the ADIF-RENFE Train Station.

The high speed train goes to the Santa Justa Seville Train station from the Cadiz Train Station, however, this leaves you with an approximately 5 kilometer walk to reach the Plaza de Espana area. So we opted to ride the "local train" so that we could exit at the San Bernardo Seville Train station (image #2 above) which gave us only a one kilometer walk.

The Cadiz Train Station (image #1) offers two methods of purchasing tickets, one being the typical "Ticket Counter" method and the other being automated ticket machines. Since we knew from previous European Travels that the automated machines might not work with American credit cards, Celeste went to see if the machine would accept our credit cards and I stayed in the ticket counter line. It was a good thing that we took this strategy, because the automated machines required a "contactless" credit card. There was no chip reader or swipe reader. Our credit cards were not contactless so they didn't work. Even the Ticket Counter card reader failed to read our card, so we wound up utilizing cash so that we could hurry and catch the train before it departed! Always carry cash is rule #1 on our European Travel Tips page.

The local train is a 90 minute ride to Seville from Cadiz (several stops along the way), and of course a 90 minute return ride. Make sure you have enough time for the train ride and arrive back in Cadiz well before the departure time for your ship. Fortunately our ship was not scheduled to depart until 7:30PM so we had more than enough time to do a "just traveling through" adventure in Seville! We saved a lot of money by not taking the ships shore excursion. The train ride was only €23.50 per person for the round trip - compare that to the ship excursion prices where the least expensive was €119 and the most expensive was €329 per person round trip. Yes, the ship excursions were done by bus, but when we inquired at the excursion desk as to what was included in those prices, they were not able to tell us!

Once you arrive in Seville, the local train stops at the Seville Metro Stations as well as the central train station. Santa Justa is the main train station, however we left our train at the San Bernardo train station (image #2) because it is much closer to the areas of Seville we wanted to visit.

After leaving the San Bernardo Train Station, we walked over to the Plaza de Espana. This is one of those "must see" places in Seville, and it is beautiful; surrounded by the Parque de Maria Luisa which contains a wide variety of beautiful flowers, trees, shaded paths, etc. Most of the grounds that were used for the park were formerly the gardens of the Palace of San Telmo. They were donated to the city of Seville in 1893 by the Infanta Luisa Fernanda, Duchess of Montpensier, for use as a public park.

The Plaza de Espana is a semi-circular brick building, Renaissance/neo-Moorish in style, with a tower at either end (tall enough to be visible around the city, these towers - north and south - are major landmarks). In front of the building, following the curve of its facade, is a 500-metre canal crossed by four bridges, and in the centre of it all is the Plaza itself. You can rent small boats to row in the canal - the Plaza is known as "the Venice of Seville". A major tourist attraction, it is the finishing point of horse-and-carriage rides.

 Quick History Lesson 

The Plaza de España is an architectural ensemble located in the Maria Luisa park in the city of Seville . It was designed by the architect Aníbal González . It was built between 1914 and 1929 as the main building, and the largest, of the Ibero - American Exposition of 1929. It is the largest of those that were erected in the city throughout the twentieth century , comparable to the other two prominent historic buildings of the extramuros of the city, which are the Hospital of the Five Wounds (XVI century) and the Royal Tobacco Factory (18th century).


 The above information was extracted from Wikipedia.
Maria Luisa Park
Museum of Arts and Traditions of Sevilla
Archivo General de Indias
Híspalis Fountain
Royal Alcázar of Seville

Once we had explored the main building and reviewed the map of the area, we realized that there was a lot to see and we didn't have much time... So we decided to take a horse drawn carriage tour. It was a little pricey at €50 for the two of us but it was fun to relax and ride in the carriage and gave us a beautiful view of the parks and major sites. The tour guide provided some info about the area as we rode however his english wasn't great so the information was limited.

Plaza de Espana
Seville Horse Carraige
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Puerta del Leon

We exited the horse drawn carriage near the Real Alcázar of Seville (Royal Palace), but found that the waiting line to get into the palace went completely around the block. In hindsight, we should have gotten our tickets in advance. We broke our own rule by not investigating this before we sailed!

 Quick History Lesson 

The Alcázar of Seville is a royal palace in Seville, Spain, built for the Christian king Peter of Castile. It was built by Castilian Christians on the site of an Abbadid Muslim residential fortress destroyed after the Christian conquest of Seville. The palace, a preeminent example of Mudéjar architecture in the Iberian Peninsula, is renowned as one of the most beautiful. The upper levels of the Alcázar are still used by the royal family as their official residence in Seville, and are administered by the Patrimonio Nacional. It is the oldest royal palace still in use in Europe, and was registered in 1987 by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, along with the adjoining Seville Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies.


 The above information was extracted from Wikipedia.

From the Royal Palace, we hiked over to the Plaza del Triunfo and then onto the Avenue de la Constitucion. As you can see in the above images, this area is a mixture of old and new architecture.

Image #2 is the Seville Metro route which runs down the center of Avenue de la Constitucion, which made the comparison between old & new even more distinct than just the buildings themselves!

With no specific destination in mind, we walked along the Avenue de la Constitucion, people watching, exploring shops, unique buildings, and taking in some street performance art. Check out the guy seeming to float in mid-air (image#2). We still aren't sure how he did that, and everybody passing by couldn't figure it out either!

We turned back and headed towards the Cathedral and the Royal Palace, as we knew that we had to be at the Seville Train Station allowing sufficient time to return to Cadiz.

We continued to explore, with the expectation that whenever a taxi came by, that we would grab it and head over to the Santa Justa Train Station.

Found a taxi, and caught the return train to Cadiz where we found a nice tapas bar just outside the cruise port. Had a couple of adult beverages to celebrate our Seville adventure.

Suggested links for Seville Spain


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